Tamborine Mountain’s green heart: Our Escarpment

The Tamborine Mountain Escarpment Protection Precinct; it’s part of who we are. It’s the Green Heart connecting disparate settlements. It makes us one community.

The Escarpment in the makingKoala With Tamborine Mountain Gorge Backdrop

In the 1980s, individuals, community groups and organisations came together to define and protect the Escarpment. Some 30 years (and more) has made the Escarpment an essential part of Tamborine Mountain culture. To develop the Escarpment took the work of many, from the Natural Heritage Trust to Tamborine Mountain Landcare and from the Beaudesert and Gold Coast Councils to the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (now National Parks) and the Federal Government.

And it took the work of Tamborine Mountain Landcare and troops of enthusiastic volunteers to regenerate vegetation in parts of the Escarpment, repair and further extend other parts.

What’s so special about the Escarpment?Tamborine Mountain Escarpment

In the 1900s, some 90 per cent of the Mountain’s natural vegetation was clear-felled under law. Despite this, much of the area where the Escarpment exists remained forested.

The Escarpment provides a beautiful green backdrop to the Scenic Rim, the Gold Coast and Brisbane. Ever been to St Bernards Hotel and looked at the view? That’s part of the Escarpment.

It’s unique in terms of natural offerings – geologically sensitive sites, water catchments, such as the ecologically sensitive Guanaba Creek, and remnant forests and rainforests.

And it’s home to species recognised at a state, national and global level, from the Albert’s Lyrebird to the Koala and from the Pearson’s Green Treefrog to the Richmond Birdwing Butterfly (to name a few).

“… the Tamborine Mountain Escarpment supports more than 80% of all native terrestrial fauna species … and 61% of flora known to occur in the Gold Coast region.” Ref. Tamborine Mountain Escarpment Flora and Fauna Report; Chenoweth.

Our unique Tamborine Mountain … why we love it

So why do people visit Tamborine Mountain? Why do people come to live here? And why do businesses set up here?

Because the Mountain offers unique green spaces, National Parks, low-key tourism, peaceful calm, charming and caring personal service, amazing flora and fauna and much, much more.

“… the Tamborine Mountain escarpment forests will be recognised as the main reason that tourists come to visit, that increasing numbers of people are choosing to reside on the Mountain and that rural industries are able to enjoy the relative security of soil protection, wind protection and the protection afforded by a large resident insectivorous bird population.” Ref. Chenoweth.

After all, Tamborine Mountain celebrates its green spaces. Government declared Queensland’s first National Park on Tamborine Mountain and since this declaration, the Mountain has become home to some 17 sections of National Park.

The escarpment will be recognised as a valuable resource of significance to southeast Queensland in particular, and a valuable adjunct to the World Heritage forests of Lamington and Border Ranges National Parks.” Ref. Chenoweth.

Why protect the Escarpment?Tamborine Mountain Forest Floor

1. The need to protect endangered, threatened and vulnerable species.
2. The need to protect sensitive ecological areas.
3. The need to protect water catchments.
4. The need to protect ground water sources.
5. The need to protect the scenic values.
6. The need to protect the current tourism on the Mountain.
7. The need to protect the community who live within the Escarpment.

“The core area for survival of the Mountain’s natural world must remain the protected areas, and the key to their survival is learning and teaching others respect for the natural world, rather than the potential for its exploitation. Meredith McKinney, who lived on the Mountain as a child with her mother, poet and environmentalist Judith Wright.

The Escarpment – our Mountain’s Green Heart – an important and significant place for Tamborine Mountain, for the Scenic Rim, for South East Queensland, for Australia and for the world.